Old France

Old Quebec city is the closest you will ever get to experiencing New France !

1534 – 1763

New France was the area colonized by France in North America during a period beginning with the exploration of the Saint Lawrence River by Jacques Cartier in 1534 and ending with the cession of New France to Spain and Great Britain in 1763. At its peak in 1712 (before the Treaty of Utrecht), the territory of New France, also sometimes known as the French North American Empire or Royal New France, extended from Newfoundland to the Rocky Mountains and from Hudson Bay to the Gulf of Mexico.

France ceded the rest of New France, except the islands of St. Pierre and Miquelon, to Great Britain and Spain at the Treaty of Paris, which ended the Seven Years’ War (the French and Indian War). Britain received the lands east of the Mississippi River that lay between the Thirteen Colonies and Louisiana, which included Canada, Acadia, and parts of Louisiana, while Spain received the territory to the west – the larger portion of Louisiana. Spain returned its portion of Louisiana to France in 1800 under the secret Treaty of San Ildefonso, but French leader Napoleon Bonaparte sold it to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, permanently ending French colonial efforts on the North American mainland.

Source

Our location is ideal to visit the old city and old port on foot. Monuments, museums, Place Royale, Hotel Chateau Frontenac, Dufferin Terrace, the waterfront and piers are all nearby. Parking, boutiques, cafes and excellent restaurants close by. A few steps away from the bus terminal and train station.

Hits: 39

Comments are closed.